So, Picture this, you have saved up or you can now qualify for a loan and you want to build your dream house/development.

Step No. 1

Get financial advice. Go to https://www.icpak.com/cpa-directory/

and pick an accountant and let them know what you want. The people here are guided by laws and give professional advice at a very small fee. Housing is more of a financial problem than an architectural one. The big corporates and entrepreneurs know that the masses are unaware of this fact and bring in all forms of new ‘low cost’ technologies to tap into your money. Plan right, the technologies will take care of themselves.

Step No. 2. Get an ARCHITECT, not a house drawer.

Go to http://www.boraqs.or.ke/Members/Architects

and pick a few names you fancy, contact them, see their kind of work, negotiate and bargain like a Kenyan and have them give you a document with their deliverables. If whomever you are using is not on that list my fren, do so at your own risk. I advise that you get an ARCHITECT as you will for one get professional guidance and there is a legal framework that protects you in case the chap misbehaves. If you feel aggrieved just drop a complaint to: [email protected] or call them on Tel. +254 020 2728 444, 0726 243 005. It’s much easier to sue for damages because if you win in court and your architect is broke, insolvent or just plain belligerent; his/her insurance will pay you.

Step No. 3 Together with your architect pick a consultants’ team.

You will need;

  1. A Quantity Surveyor: A QS is a construction industry professional with expert knowledge on construction costs and contracts, cost planning and commercial management throughout the entire life cycle of the project… from inception to post-completion. Even the good book tells you to use a QS. Ebu go to Luke 14:28-29 “Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Won’t you first sit down and estimate the cost to see if you have enough money to complete it?29 For if you lay the foundation and are not able to finish it, everyone who sees it will ridicule you, 30 saying, ‘This person began to build and wasn’t able to finish.’

QS list is here http://www.boraqs.or.ke/Members/QuantitySurveyors

 

Now go forth and sin no more.

 

  1. A structural Engineer: These are a queer and annoying bunch of ladies and gentlemen who are trained to understand, predict, and calculate the stability, strength and rigidity of built structures for buildings and to develop designs and integrate their design with that of other designers (like Architects, interior designers, landscape architects etc.), and to supervise construction of projects on site. These guys will give you a super-efficient structural design to help you save on costs.
  2. Mechatronic/ Electro-mechanical (Mechanical and Electrical) Engineers: These guys deal with electrical designs and systems, ICT, security like CCTV, interconnection, plumbing, hot water systems, dual piping systems, recycling systems, water disposal systems etc. As a building consultant, this is the area that goes wrong in MOST domestic construction projects. Get these guys to design an efficient system and let them inspect before any ‘korogaring’, basically throughout the construction project. Before you plaster ensure they have supervised a water pressure test for your whole plumbing system. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6guBgaGlew). Failure to which, get ready for machozi stir-fry.
  3. As I told you Engineers are just engineers and don’t update their website frequently. So if you don’t find your Engineer on their website, just write an email to the Engineers Board of Kenya, [email protected] , they respond quickly. Or call them on these numbers +254-735-330744, +254-722-509972 . You may use the same details to snitch on them if they decide to misbehave.

For registered engineers http://ebk.or.ke/registered-consulting-engineers/

For graduated engineers awaiting a licencehttp://ebk.or.ke/registered-graduate-engineers/

We hope this information is helpful. We leave you with a quote from Benjamin Franklin. “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”